Voting: Which Method Is Right for You?

Jenny Wolochow studied Philosophy and Religious Studies at Stanford University (MA ‘11), taught elementary school in California through Teach for America, and now works as a Product Marketing Manager for Partners at Coursera.  She is passionate about civic engagement and explains why in this post, which also touts voting by mail and links to a great guide she developed to help California voters navigate this year’s ballot.  Views expressed here are her own.

jenny-wolochow

Jenny Wolochow

I know some of you are disenchanted with American politics – especially this year.  But the craziness of this presidential election shouldn’t stop you from participating in our democracy.

Voting is a right that not everyone has, and our ancestors fought hard to earn us that right.  It’s a chance to have our voices heard – and it can make a difference.  For those reasons, it’s an important responsibility for us to take advantage of that opportunity and to use it well and wisely.

Outside of just the presidential election, there are many local candidates who deserve your attention.  In fact, one could argue that state and local races matter considerably more than federal ones.  If you live in 35 states, specific policy issues will be on the ballot and should also be on your radar.  I live in one of those states and have created a ballot guide to help my fellow Californians navigate this year’s voluminous and confusing set of propositions.  The guide includes information on the San Francisco ballot measures as well.

Knowing your options for how to vote (i.e., by what method you should vote) is also important.  Most states have three voting methods: (1) in person on election day, (2) in person early, or (3) by mail.  You can use the resources at vote.org to check with your local elections office to see the available methods and key deadlines this year.

My recommendation: If you want to get the biggest return on investment for your vote, you can get the same “benefit” with a very low “cost” by choosing to vote by mail.  As I’ve learned firsthand from being a native Oregonian (voting by mail is the default for everyone in the state), voting by mail has three important advantages over in-person voting:

1) It’s convenient. When you vote by mail, you can vote whenever you have time; you don’t have to worry about your schedule.  Traveling out of town on election day?  No problem.  Too busy at work to get time off for voting in person?  No big deal.  Not sure where your polling place is?  Doesn’t matter.  You don’t even have to fill out the ballot all at once; you can space it out and fill in parts of it whenever you have the time.  You can choose to return your completed vote-by-mail ballot either in person or by mail to a county elections office.  Just remember that your ballot must be turned in before the polls close on election day.

2) It helps you make thoughtful, informed choices.  When you get your ballot in advance, you have plenty of time to review it, consider your options, and research issues.

3) It’s more private than in-person voting.  You decide when and where to fill out a vote-by-mail ballot and put it in a sealed envelope, instead of having to carry your ballot around in a public place with a thin divider.

Voting is not perfect.  Our democratic system is not perfect.  But there are still good reasons to participate in it, and it’s often easier and more productive to vote than many people think.

1 Comment

Filed under 2016 Presidential Election, US Political System

One response to “Voting: Which Method Is Right for You?

  1. carlbradleyherman

    Jenny, with all respect, you might want to consider that Stanford and Princeton have been at the forefront to demonstrate the mathematically obvious: an election fails to meet its definition when ~25% of the votes have no physical evidence to be counted from electronic voting machines. There is a similar condition with “voting” by mail when you surrender the evidence to our .01% “leaders” to “count” for us.

    Consider this (links in below document):

    Election fraud, not election

    We’ve documented that the US use of electronic voting machines without a paper trail fails to meet the definition of election because it requires physical votes subject to independently verifiable counting (with videos). If there’s nothing to count, the “election” is literally unaccountable, unverifiable, and a staged show.

    Now, Election Justice USA issued their report of the 2016 primaries, Democracy Lost, with findings that Bernie Sanders won the Democratic primaries, but was denied victory from the following types of election fraud (pg. 95, and with analysis and videos here):

    1) Targeted voter suppression

    2) Registration tampering

    3) Illegal voter purges

    4) Exit polling discrepancies

    5) Evidence for voting machine tampering

    6) The security (or lack thereof) of various voting machine types

    http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2016/08/three-essential-us-stands-not-president-upon-election-independent-debate-rogue-state-dictator-upon-ele.html

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s